Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Designer Monthly Preview

The woman who helped usher the interior design industry into full flower in the United States was prolific in putting out ideas that will help freshen up today's interior design business. Look at our latest Designer Monthly, Interior Design: Look Forward by Looking Back to Dorothy Draper.

Did you ever have a problem designing small spaces?  Take a look at how top interior designers solved this common problem in our latest Designer Monthly, How to Design Small Spaces at the Kips Bay Decorator Show House.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday
Jul302013

Decorating Tips: Wall Decor

If you're looking for a different way to decorating your walls - take a look at these wall accessories. Instead of the usual paintings or prints, go for three-dimensional accessories.  Above we have a variety of floral decor, the silver and red flowers are made from metal and available from Joss & Main. The turquoise carving is from painted teak. Below we have colorful ceramic tiles with a raised sunflower motif - from Hayneedle

For a classical theme, try plaster relief panels.  This graceful urn from Restoration Hardware could top a fireplace mantel.  If you want an exotic theme, turn to this intricate Islamic pointed arch plasterwork from Hayles & Howe.  The panel can placed over a door or simply by itself on a wall. 

(Urn Plaster from Restoration Hardware)

Islamic arch from Hayles & Howe

If you really want creative control and a variety of configurations to choose from, take a look at the Wallter panels from Inmod.  These are light weight shapes that can be painted and positioned into different designs. Below is the Retro Hex shape and the Retro Teardrop shapes. 

Wallter Panel from Inmod

Wallter Panel from Inmod

 

 

Interested in learning more about accessories?  Take a look at Sheffield School's Complete Course in Interior Design.  At Sheffield, you will learn how to transform a space, create color schemes, and select furniture, lighting, and accessories.

http://www.inmod.com
Friday
Jul262013

Random Interesting Rings

 

 


Murder She Wrote Ring by Stephen Webster

While these are not the type of rings that we are teaching students to make here in the Sheffield Jewelry Design Course, I thought you would still enjoy seeing them. During my search for blog images, for other blogs, I have set aside a few interesting rings that I have come across. Not knowing what to do with them, I figured posting them under the title random interesting rings is self explanatory. Starting off with Stephen Webster's ring, since we are here in the big apple. Enjoy!

Paris snow globe ring on Pinterest

 


Selda Okutan Ring  

Szofita on Etsy

Seven Dwarfs two finger ring 

fashionhause

 

Are you interested in taking a great jewelry design course and learning more about how to make your own jewelry or get started professionally in this creative field? Sheffield School began as an Interior Design school in 1985, and then expanded our course offerings to train people in other design-related fields, including Feng ShuiWedding and Event Planning, and Jewelry Design. With thousands of active students and more than 50,000 graduates, Sheffield has trained more design professionals than any school in the world.

 
  • Request a free Sheffield School catalog describing our distance education courses.
  •  
  • Subscribe to the Sheffield Designer newsletter.
  • Wednesday
    Jul172013

    Antiques versus Reproductions

    Dining room at Old Westbury Gardens

    I’m frequently asked by budding interior design students – do I need to know about antique furniture? Many clients can’t afford it! Or another refrain:  I don’t understand the different styles of period furniture – help! To which I reply: Yes, you do need to know about antique furniture and yes, I can help you figure out the different nuances of the period styles. 

    Antique furniture is very expensive – first, they are a limited supply, second, they’re usually made of rare (or even extinct) woods and finally because of their exquisite craftsmanship. Since antiques are limited but still sought after, furniture manufacturers have created reproductions of the popular styles. And this is where your expertise comes in handy. If you know how the original antiques looked like and how they were made, then you can better assess whether or not the furniture makers did a good job with the reproductions.

    Let’s compare some originals and reproductions!

    Louis XV Fauteuil from 1st DibsA popular French period style is the Louis XV style, also known as the Rococo style.  A Louis XV chair will feature a cabriole leg – an S-shaped leg – that is carved and decorated with shells or floral motifs.  The chair will also display the same carved motifs on its chair rail and seat rail. In the above photo, we have an original Louis XV antique fauteuil or armchair. Furniture of this period was made of expensive woods like walnut or oak. Chairs were typically upholstered in expensive silks.

    Below we have a reproduction of the Louis XV style from Ethan Allen.  Their Chantel chair boasts of the same cabriole leg and the curved chair and seat rail but the details are simplified with none of the shell or floral motifs of the original. Also, the reproductions are made of a less expensive wood like maple or birch. In this case, the manufacturer did a wonderful job of recreating a Louis XV reproduction, albeit a simplified version.

    Chantel chair from Ethan Allen

    Stay tuned for next week's discussions on Antiques versus Reproductions!

     


    Interested in learning more about antique furniture styles?  Take a look at Sheffield School's Complete Course in Interior Design.  At Sheffield, you will learn how to transform a space, create color schemes, and select furniture, lighting, and accessories.

    Friday
    Jul122013

    Organizing Ideas For Your Beads and Jewelry Supplies

    Christine Marie Studio blogspot

    Many Sheffield students ask me what is the best way to store their beads - by color, size, or shape? When you develop a jewelry making addiction the supplies seem so tiny and harmless, but they start to add up and take over your room real fast. This can lead to a confusing mess unless you are willing to put your creativity into your organizational skills and find a solution that works for your space. 

    Jars of beadson 2 me 4 art blog.

    There is no right or wrong way to store your jewelry supplies, but it is far better to see your materials and know what you have to work with, rather than relying on memory. Separating materials properly creates the need for lots of small storage spaces but will make your life easier when you are scanning your materials for the perfect stone or bead for your project. I have always liked the look of glass jars for storage but do not trust myself with all that glass. 

     

    Whether you keep them separated with trays inside a drawer to tuck them out of site, or visible in jars on shelves, it does not really matter if you separate them by by color, size or shape. Depending on what you make you will find that you reach for some things more often than others. Figuring out what those items are will help you start the organization process.

    Nick and Caeli blogspot

    Not only will it be easier for you to see what you have to use when working, but it will save you from going out and purchase something you already had. 

    Haley M bead storage idea.

    My gemstones and findings are separated in tins, with clear lids, inside drawers. I can easily see what I have when working and keep the items I use most in the top drawers. In a larger bottom drawer I keep my larger gemstones inside zip lock bags. Inside each bag I write how much each stone costs. When I purchase a strand of stones I write the cost of the strand (for comparison shopping) and I count how many stones are on the strand. I then divide the price of the strand by the number of stones, which gives me a price per bead. When reaching to use that stone in a design a year later, I will know how to calculate my costs for pricing the piece I am working on. 

    If you are more of a part time addict, or live in a really small space, you may want to tuck your supplies away in a trunk and slide it under a bed or inside a closet. If you want your part time addiction to be displayed proudly, Amy Powers shows us how to convert an old suitcase into fun storage with this great tutorial.

    A parts storage container meant for screws and washers is a great way to neatly store beads and findings. They can be be purchased at nearly every hardware store. The small drawers are clear so it is easy to see what is inside, while keeping everything in a contained area so it is not taking up too much space.

     

    Martha Stewart hinged 2 bookcases together, Pinterest.

    Martha Stewart hinged two bookcases together to form a closing cabinet. It is so beautifully organized if it were in my house I would feel no need to close it. It feels almost too perfect to mess up by actually working on it. Love that the tools are neatly hanging in front and the beads are stacked in clear containers on the shelves at eye level. 

     

    Are you interested in taking a great jewelry design course and learning more about how to make your own jewelry or get started professionally in this creative field? Sheffield School began as an Interior Design school in 1985, and then expanded our course offerings to train people in other design-related fields, including Feng ShuiWedding and Event Planning, and Jewelry Design. With thousands of active students and more than 50,000 graduates, Sheffield has trained more design professionals than any school in the world.

     
  • Request a free Sheffield School catalog describing our distance education courses.
  •  
  • Subscribe to the Sheffield Designer newsletter.
  • Wednesday
    Jul102013

    Weekend Getaway: Visiting Winterthur

    Winterthur

    Looking for a weekend trip idea?  Why not combine a weekend getaway with a little interior design education?  Winterthur is a beautiful 19th century home of the du Pont family located in the picturesque Brandywine Valley region of Pennsylvania and Delaware.  What’s even more special about Winterthur is that it houses the largest collection of American period furniture and decorative arts and it is open to the public.

    Period furniture, courtesy of Winterthur

    Winterthur houses several galleries full of decorative objects such as ceramics, glass, textiles, furniture and paintings. The above photo shows exceptional examples of period furniture – including a Sheraton-style secretary, a Federal high chest of drawers, and a pie-crust tea table with a tilt top.   

    Besides decorative objects, the mansion boasts of 175 rooms and several of them are decorated in authentic period furniture.  The Port Royal Parlor below is just one example. The parlor is full of Chippendale-style chairs, tea table, and high chest. 

    Port Royal Parlor, courtesy of Winterthur

    Besides beautiful interiors, Winterthur sits on a 60 acre estate filled with floral gardens, walkways, woods, and picnic spots. Don’t forget to include Winterthur in your weekend getaway plans!

     

    Interested in learning more about the history of furniture periods?  Take a look at Sheffield School's Complete Course in Interior Design.  At Sheffield, you will learn how to transform a space, create color schemes, and select furniture, lighting, and accessories.

    Page 1 ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... 152 Next 5 Entries »